390 Rainier Club, St. Paul and Pacific No. The DM&IR was formed by the merger in 1937 of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway (DM&N) and the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway. As a contrast, No. They were operated by the Baltimore and Ohio, Northern Pacific, Southern Pacific, and Duluth Missabe & Iron Range. At first, they burned coal but were later converted to oil. By hinging the driving wheels in two sets, a much larger and more powerful locomotive could be built that could travel easier through curves. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. That continued until January 21, 1947, when near Oakland, Maryland, train 29 with engine 7625 derailed with the locomotive rolling onto the engineer's side, killing the engineer. DM&IR No. 224 to wreck on the Fireclay Loop.

The ready availability of oil fuel in California made them possible. 2. The engine was designed to operate efficiently at 45 miles per hour. In 1887, the D&IR was acquired by Illinois Steel Company, which itself became part of the new United States Steel Corporation (USS) in 1901.
Nothing bigger could operate within the tunnel clearances and track restrictions on the B&O's main line. After high-grade Mesabi iron ore was discovered near Mountain Iron, Minnesota by the Seven Iron Men, the D&IR was asked to build a branch line to serve this area, but declined. The articulated evolved because engines with four, five, or six coupled axles became more and more difficult to build and maneuver. Weighing some 566 tons in working order, and stretching 128 feet in length, the No. 7600 for railfan trips. 7600 for railfan trips mostly between Cumberland, MD, and Connellsville, PA. 225 at Proctor, No. That year the first diesel locomotives, EMD SW9s, arrived on the railway. Only 72 Yellowstone locomotives were ever built in the U.S. Lake Superior Railroad Museum&North Shore Scenic Railroad Wiki is a FANDOM Lifestyle Community.

The DM&IR Yellowstones were 128 feet long and weighed in at over 400 tons with no coal or water.

The first eight were delivered in 1941 and performed beyond the DM&IR's expectations, who ordered another ten of these engines in 1943.

In 2001, the DM&IR and other holdings were spun off from Transtar into the company Great Lakes Transportation (GLT), which was fully owned by the Blackstone Group. The equivalent UIC classification is, refined for Mallet locomotives, (1′D)D2′. In the late 1950s, the B&O used EM-1 No. Filling the tender took 26 tons of coal and 25,000 gallons of water. This merger was intended to increase efficiency.[2].

The following year, the Merritts expanded the DM&N by laying track to Duluth, Minnesota, where they built an ore dock. . After an accident on Tennessee Pass, the loaned engines were returned. Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range No. This enormous engine was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1941 for the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Ridge railroad, one of the primary iron ore hauling railroads in Minnesota.
Map of the DM&IR. 1 "Minnetonka".

The next winter, the D&RGW again leased the DM&IR's Yellowstones as helpers over Tennessee Pass, Colorado, and for other freight duties. A 2-8-8-4 steam locomotive, under the Whyte notation, has two leading wheels, two sets of eight driving wheels, and a four-wheel trailing truck. Well-known photographer and Cumberland, MD, native William P. Price captured on still pictures and 8mm films, the EM-1s on the east side of Sand Patch pulling heavy trains with two of the B&O's 2-10-2 class S1 and S1a Big Sixes on the rear as helpers dispatched from Hyndman, PA. Near the end of steam they were all sent out to Fairmont and Wheeling, West Virginia, and Lorain, Ohio, with lake-bound coal trains as well as runs between Willard, OH and Garrett, Indiana, until the B&O started to retire them in 1957, and almost all of them were scrapped. These locomotives were based upon ten 2-8-8-2s that Baldwin had built in the 1930s for the Western Pacific Railroad. It carried 26 tons of coal and 25,000 gallons of water in its tender. The DM&IR donated #225 to the city of Proctor on the 25th of March, 1963, and put on display at Charles E Carlson Park, where it remains today. Duluth Missabe & Iron Range Yellowstone Mallet #229. Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range No. Seventy-two Yellowstone-type locomotives were built for four U.S. railroads. The DM&IR matched that contribution, performed all restoration, and donated the locomotive to the Museum. 224 is a class M-3 2-8-8-4 "Yellowstone" type steam locomotive built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1941 for the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Ridge railroad, one of the primary iron ore hauling railroads in Minnesota. By July 1938, the two railways merged to form the DM&IR. (The amendment restricted the state's ability to tax a taconite industry for 25 years.) 659, where it stood. (For greater speeds, the Union Pacific Railroad chose a four-wheel leading truck and drivers of 68 inches (1.73 m) for its Big Boy 4-8-8-4 class.).

But the War Production Board regulated the production of steam and diesel locomotives until the war emergency was over. The Eveleth Taconite Company was formed in 1964 and on April 8, 1966, the SS Edmund Fitzgerald took on the first load of Eveleth taconite pellets, about 23,000 tons. The following year, the Duluth and Iron Range Rail Road (D&IR) and Interstate Transfer Railway were added. The Mallet No. 225 is a class M-3 2-8-8-4 "Yellowstone" type steam locomotive currently on static display at Charles E. Carlson Park. It had the largest firebox ever applied to a steam locomotive, some 182 square feet (16.9 m2) in area, to burn Rosebud coal, a cheap low-quality coal. 227 is one of the largest and most powerful steam locomotives ever constructed. On July 31, 1884, the D&IR carried its first ore shipment from the Soudan Mine. The first was built in 1928 by American Locomotive Company; at the time, it was the largest locomotive ever built. The second batch was completed in late 1943 after the Missabe's seasonal downturn in ore traffic, so some of the new M-4s were leased to and delivered directly to the Denver & Rio Grande Western. P38.002 bore no such adornments and had a more conventional appearance.

Baldwin Locomotive Works built 11 more for the Northern Pacific in 1930. This enormous engine was built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1941 for the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Ridge railroad, one of the primary iron ore hauling railroads in Minnesota. This arrangement earned them the name "Yellowstones" and were the most powerful engines of this type, producing 140,000 lbf of tractive effort. From 1901 to 1938, the two railways were owned by USS and operated separately. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. The need for a larger, coal-burning firebox and a longer, all-weather cab led to the use of a four-wheel trailing truck, giving them the "Yellowstone" wheel arrangement. The Rio Grande returned the Yellowstones after air-brake failure caused No. When the U.S. entered World War II The American railroads saw increases in traffic. Only one Yellowstone was retired before dieselization took place on the Missabe; No. Now, none of the EM-1s survive today. [3][page needed], A visitor walks next to the wheels of a DM&IR Yellowstone locomotive, Rolling stock of former Soviet Union countries, Learn how and when to remove this template message, Web Site of ToyTrains1 2-8-8-4 Yellowstone Steam Locomotives, "Is This Monster Locomotive a HE or SHE? Indeed, even the 2-8-8-0 locomotives - the most powerful ones of the DM&IR's roster - needed a helping hand. Iron ore is heavy, and combined with the railroads steep grades, made transporting this material from the mines to the Great Lakes a tricky task and required great amounts of power. Of the eighteen built, three survive and are on display in Minnesota: No. DULUTH, MISSABE, AND IRON RANGE RAILWAY: An Inventory of Its Records at the Minnesota Historical Society, List of United States railroads by political division, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Duluth,_Missabe_and_Iron_Range_Railway&oldid=986268741, Former Class I railroads in the United States, Former regional railroads in the United States, Predecessors of the Canadian National Railway, Transportation in Douglas County, Wisconsin, Transportation in St. Louis County, Minnesota, Articles with unsourced statements from December 2009, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 30 October 2020, at 20:18. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, along with other railroads, wanted to purchase more of the diesel locomotives since they were showing improved performance over steam locomotives. Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat.

For the first time in more than 100 years DM&IR was no longer associated with U.S. Steel. [citation needed] Ore movement was nearly 45 million tons in 1942 and the War Production Board allowed the Missabe to order ten more Yellowstones, delivered in 1943. The two operating divisions, the Missabe and the Iron Range, were based upon the predecessor roads. The following year, the Duluth and Iron Range Rail Road (D&IR) and Interstate Transfer Railway were added.

So along with producing 40 new class T-3 4-8-2 type locomotives built in-house at their Mt. The Yellowstones met or exceeded the DM&IR specifications, so 10 more were ordered (class M-4).

More Lake Superior Railroad Museum&North Shore Scenic Railroad Wiki, Northern Pacific Railway No. The DM&IR was formed by the merger in 1937 of the Duluth, Missabe and Northern Railway (DM&N) and the Spirit Lake Transfer Railway.


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